Corpus Christi

Corpus Christi councilmen express concern for plans regarding proposed desalination plant – Texas – United States

The Port of Corpus Christi has submitted a low interest loan application with the State of Texas for its Harbor Island Desalination Plant Project. 

The cost of the project is estimated to be half a billion dollars. The Port is hoping to get its permit sometime next month to be able to have the plant built on Harbor Island. 

However, the new information did not sit well with at least two city council members. 

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Proposed desalination plant could take step forward at city council meeting – Texas

A proposed desalination plant could take another step towards becoming a reality Tuesday despite cost and environmental concerns from some Corpus Christi citizens.

The city council will consider authorizing City Manager Peter Zanoni to negotiate contracts to buy plots of land on which a plant or multiple plants would be built.

The actual purchase wouldn’t be final until a separate city council vote at a future meeting, but a city leader close to the efforts says Tuesday’s vote will be significant.

Port of CC commissioners vote to purchase more than 700 acres from Cheniere – Texas – United States

The Port of Corpus Christi Authority expanded its portfolio with the purchase of two separate parcels of land equaling more than 700 acres of San Patricio County property from Cheniere Energy.

Last Tuesday, port authority commissioners voted to adopt a resolution authorizing closing on a commercial contract which would see the port purchase a 552.087-acre tract of land in Ingleside on the La Quinta Channel and 158.65-acre tract of land south of Taft.

“We’ve been in serious negotiations with Cheniere for over half a year on this property,” Port of Corpus Christi Chief Financial Officer Kent Britton said.

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The latest on the Desalination Plant in Corpus Christi – Texas

That is because on and off, the Coastal Bend falls into a drought, and as you may recall, this area is in a stage one water restriction.

Following a dangerous drought in 2011, an idea was born to bring a more resilient, reliable, and cost-effective water source to the Coastal Bend.

More specifically, a drought-resistant water supply that could produce up to 20 million gallons of potable water daily.

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Water restrictions puts spotlight back on desalination plant conversation – Texas

The restrictions are part of the drought contingency plan and are based on the combined capacity lake levels of Lake Corpus Christi and the Choke Canyon Reservoir.

That level has now fallen to below 40-percent.For most of us, the initial part of this plan will affect when we water the lawn.

Corpus Christi’s Mayor Joe McComb said finding an alternative water source could very well help the city avoid future water restrictions during drought conditions.

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Windsor Park Elementary students debate topic of desalination – Texas

It’s a highly debated issue, whether the city of Corpus Christi should construct a multi-million-dollar saltwater desalination plant in the city’s inner harbor.

On Friday, some of our youngest citizens tackled the real-world topic.

They may be third graders, but a group of Windsor Park Elementary students took time to debate the pros and cons of building a desal plant and what it could mean for a future water supply.

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City of Corpus Christi approved for $11.4 million loan to continue seawater desal project – Texas

The City of Corpus Christi is continuing with its $222 million seawater desalination project after being approved for an $11.4 million loan from the Texas Water Development Board.

The $11.4 million loan from the Texas Water Development Board will allow the City of Corpus Christi to do more research about where and how the seawater desalination plant would fit in the Coastal Bend, according to Steve Ramos, Water Resource Manager for the City.

Ramos said by doing more research, when it comes time to present an execution plan, all the kinks are worked out.

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Here’s what desalination plant projects private companies presented to City Council – Texas

The city of Corpus Christi won’t decide how it’s going to build and operate a desalination plant until next year or 2022. 

But during its regular meeting Tuesday, City Council heard from 10 companies that presented their proposals for alternative water sources for Corpus Christi.

Two of the proposals were for ground water projects, two were for wastewater reuse and six were for desalination. 

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McComb: Passage for first loan for Desal Plant will result in ‘no increase’ to your water bill – Texas – United States

On August 25, Corpus Christi City Council members voted to accept a loan from the Texas Water Development Board to execute the next step in building a Seawater Desalination Plant.

Mayor Joe McComb announced via Facebook that this loan is not to build a plant and will result in no increase to your water bill.

Despite a heated debate during the City Council meeting, there were enough council members who voted (6-3) in favor of pursuing an $11.4 million loan from the Texas Water Development Board.

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Area citizens unite against desal plants – Texas

Corpus Christi’s controversial seawater desalination plants have been in the works since 2014 and in May took another step toward completion with the Corpus Christi City Council approving action to apply for financial assistance. 

The city began evaluating potential future water supplies in 2014 as a result of the drought conditions experienced in 2010-2013. After intensive evaluation by a multi-disciplinary group during the first phase, the conclusion was reached that seawater desalination was feasible as a new source for some of the region’s’ water supply needs.

The two plants will be located at the Inner Harbor Ship Channel in Port Aransas next to the ferry landing and the other in the vicinity of La Quinta Channel in San Patricio County.

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