South Texas

Water restrictions puts spotlight back on desalination plant conversation – Texas

The restrictions are part of the drought contingency plan and are based on the combined capacity lake levels of Lake Corpus Christi and the Choke Canyon Reservoir.

That level has now fallen to below 40-percent.For most of us, the initial part of this plan will affect when we water the lawn.

Corpus Christi’s Mayor Joe McComb said finding an alternative water source could very well help the city avoid future water restrictions during drought conditions.

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Area citizens unite against desal plants – Texas

Corpus Christi’s controversial seawater desalination plants have been in the works since 2014 and in May took another step toward completion with the Corpus Christi City Council approving action to apply for financial assistance. 

The city began evaluating potential future water supplies in 2014 as a result of the drought conditions experienced in 2010-2013. After intensive evaluation by a multi-disciplinary group during the first phase, the conclusion was reached that seawater desalination was feasible as a new source for some of the region’s’ water supply needs.

The two plants will be located at the Inner Harbor Ship Channel in Port Aransas next to the ferry landing and the other in the vicinity of La Quinta Channel in San Patricio County.

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Why Environmental Groups Are Salty on Corpus Christi’s Pricey Desalination Plan – Corpus Christi – Texas

Having tried little else to save its water supply, Corpus Christi is considering an option that no other Texas city has embraced: seawater desalination. The strategy has long been considered a far-in-the-future option because of its cost, logistical challenges and environmental side effects.

Nonetheless, Corpus is plunging ahead in the hopes of diversifying its water supply, which consists entirely of three shallow surface water lakes that rapidly shrink during droughts.

City officials argue that desalination would provide an uninterruptible supply of water for the city’s growing port and industrial area.

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